Bikers Right Organisation Of New Zealand
 
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POSITION PAPER: TRAFFIC ENFORCEMENT (SPEED CAMERAS / FLYING SOUADS)

Introduction

Speed cameras and flying squads are two of several road safety initiatives that help enforce speed limits and deter alcohol impaired drivers, thereby reducing the unacceptable level of road crashes and fatalities.

The principle objective in introducing Speed Cameras must be to reduce traveling speeds in areas that are proven to have a serious crash history or a recognised "black spot".  These cameras should establish a base for a long-term change in driver’s attitudes to driving at an unsafe speed for these areas.  There is significant public support for speed cameras provided they are used to improve road safety, not as a means of gaining additional revenue.

The principle objective in introducing Flying Squads is to deter alcohol impaired drivers by making it evident that the chances of being apprehended are higher.  These squads should establish a base for a long-term change in driver’s attitudes to driving while impaired by alcohol.  There is significant public support for flying squads and similar initiatives providing they are used to improve road safety.

BRONZ Inc Policy:

Speed Cameras:
BRONZ Inc does not support the requirement for front number plates on motorcycles in order to more readily identify motorcycles in speed camera photos.  Front number plates have proved to be dangerous to motorcyclists and any requirement for front number plates is opposed.  The procedures adopted for the use of speed cameras must be fair and reasonable at all times, with clear criteria adopted before they are installed at any location:

  • The site must have a serious crash history or be a recognised "black spot";
  • Speed must have been a major factor in these crashes, with a high level of injury;
  • All sites must be clearly signposted in advance to maximise the deterrent factor and increase public awareness.  The signs should remind motorists of the prevailing speed;
  • The speed limit at the site must be appropriate;
  • The threshold at which a speed camera is used must be fair and reasonable for that section of road;
  • Traditional methods of enforcement must have proved to be impractical or ineffective at that site;
  •  Motorcyclists must be treated in exactly the same way as other motorists with respect to speed camera enforcement.

Flying Squads:
The procedures adopted for the use of flying squads must be fair and reasonable times, with clear criteria adopted before they are used at any location:

  • The site must be such that the operation of a vehicle stopping will not affect the safety of other road users;
  • All sites must be clearly signposted in advance to maximise the deterrent factor and increase public awareness;
  • Screening procedures at these sites must be completed as swiftly as possible in order not to inconvenience road users;
  • Motorcycles must be treated in exactly the same way as other motorists at flying squad locations.

Summary:

Enforcement by the use of speed cameras must concentrate on deterring excessive speeds at locations where there is an increased risk factor and/or severity of injury associated with speed.  The reducing of speed on local and rural locations is not an appropriate use of such speed cameras.  Such needs should be addressed through traffic management methods.

Front number plates on motorcycles have proved to be dangerous and any policy to support their re-introduction to more readily identify motorcyclists in speed camera photos is opposed.

Flying squads should concentrate on the deterring of alcohol impaired drivers.  It is not appropriate to use these checkpoints to enforce "minor" traffic infringements.  Such needs should be addressed through traffic management methods.

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